Money

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: 2.MD.8 Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

CT State Standards: P.1, P.2: Identify names and values of common coins

Coin Identification

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • Present your child with coins. If they can identify the coin by it’s name, then they get to put that coin in the piggy bank! On a rainy day, take out all of one type of coin and purchase a special item!
  • Coin rubbings! Grab some paper, crayons and coins. Put the coin under the paper and shade over it with your crayon. Don’t forget to do both the backs and the fronts. Write the coins’ name underneath the rubbings.
  • Create flash cards with the coin names written on them. Take another set of index cards and paste a picture of a coin (or even a real coin!) on it. Have your child match them. Challenge your child to see if they can still identify the coin even with their eyes closed!
  • Practice singing songs that teach about coins on Youtube.com!
    • The Coin Song- US coins By: Grancie48 The Coin Song By: RealKid2020
    • Learn Your Coins- Song By: Sbhammonds
    • Money Money Money! (kids song by Rhonda Crigger) By: HarryKindergarten

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: 2.MD.8: Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

CT State Standards: P.1, P2:: Identify names and values of common coins

Coin Value

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • When you go to the store, have your child bring a pocket full of change. When it comes time to pay, count the change from their pocket. Have your child pay the cashier and say the coin values while hanging the money to the cashier.
  • Allow your child to “purchase” privileges around the house. If they want to use the computer, they will have to “pay” 25 cents. Encourage the child to say the name of the coin and the value as they “pay” for the item or privilege.
  • Play Money Bingo. Put the coin’s names on a bingo and have the caller state an amount of the coin. The child will hear the value and match it to the coin name on the board. It would be great to reverse the sequence and see how they do! Try calling the name of the coin and they have to match it to the appropriate value on the board.
  • Collect all of your household’s loose change at the end of the day. Before going to bed, sort the money into cups based on their values. At the end of the week, use one cup of coins to purchase a special treat. Ice cream anyone?
  • Here are some fun books about coins:
    • One Cent, Two Cents, Old Cent, New Cent: All About Money (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library) By: Bonnie Worth and Aristides Ruiz
    • The Berenstain Bears' Trouble with Money By: Stan Berenstain and Jan Berenstain
    • The Everything Kids' Money Book: Earn it, save it, and watch it grow! (Everything Kids Series) By: Brette McWhorter Sember

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: 2.MD.8 Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

CT State Standards: P.1, P.2, P.3: Identify names and values of common coins, count money - up to $1

Coin Exchanges

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • If you give your child allowance, alternate the way the money is delivered each time. One day a quarter, the next day two dimes and a nickel and so on. Reinforce the concept that it is the same amount of money, just less or more coins.
  • Create flashcards containing various coin combinations and coin values. Much like Go Fish, ask the other team players if they have X amount of cents. If the person has the equivalency, collect it and go again!
  • Family fun time! Create signs containing different coin combinations as well as a total coin values. Tape these signs to the backs of the people playing. Search around for your “match”. When you find your match, yell out “Money Exchange!” At that moment, every can take off their sign and switch it with the person closest to them. Start again and have fun!
  • Rainy Day Math can be fun. Pull out your coin jar and practice making coin exchanges. See how many you can make in 5 minutes!
  • Make flashcards containing both coin totals and coin combinations. Play “War”. Who has the higher coin value? If you do, you get to keep both cards! If you have created an equivalent pair, put down three cards and then see how has the higher value. The highest value gets ALL the cards.
  • Role play shopping around the house. Allow your child to be both the customer and the cashier. Use only coins to purchase items and to make change. Only accept multiple coin to pay- if the item is 50 cents, your child can’t pay with a half dollar. They could choose to pay with two quarters instead.
  • Think of all the possible ways to make one dollar! Have your child create a poster sharing your knowledge with your family.

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: 2.MD.8 Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

CT State Standards: P.1, P.2, P.3: Identify names and values of common coins, count money - up to $1

Coin Counting (Same Coins)

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • Empty your piggy bank and count coins together. - Practice skip counting by 5’s, 10’s and 25’s. They can earn a coin of that value with each correct answer. Count to 50 by 5’s- well you just earned 10 nickels!
  • Each day, collect all of the same coin. Sit as a family and count it. When the total is determined, figure out what special “fund” the money can go into. Planning a vacation? Maybe the “vacation fund” money can be used to buy a new tee shirt!
  • Adding Money Stack! Each player starts with a pile of coins. Then separate each pile into each type of coin -- pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters. Then add each pile of coins. Finally, add all the coins together. The winner is the one with the most money.
  • Check out this video and learn how to make your own money board game!
    • Counting Coins in The Money Game | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/video_4429482_counting-coins-money-game.html#ixzz1HNxcNfaU
  • Family Game Night! Find a new money board games to play:
    • Money Bags By: Learning Resources
    • Loose Change By: MindWare
    • Presto Change - O By: Educational Insights

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: 2.MD.8 Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

CT State Standards: P.1, P.2, P.3: Identify names and values of common coins, count money - up to $1

Counting Mixed Coins

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • When out in the community, give your child their own pocketful of change. Allow them to help you pay for the items. Encourage your child to count out loud so you can help them if needed.
  • Give your child a bag of coins each day. If they count the correct amount of coins in each bag, they get to keep it. On Friday, have them count all of the money they earned during the week. Take them to buy a special item.
  • Count the number of days in the school year with coins! On the first day of school, count 1 cent. On the second day of school, 2 cents, all the way to 182 cents. On the last day of school, put the money towards getting a special edible treat to celebrate!
  • Create a tag sale. Allow your child to set the prices. They will be in charge of counting the money as it comes in. For advance money skills, allow them to count out change to return to the customer.
  • Make groups of assorted coins and introduce counting different coins together. Place three dimes, five nickels and seven pennies together in a pile. Show the child how to count the coins together, always starting with the coins of highest value first. Reinforce this concept by making as many groups of assorted coins as necessary until your child is comfortable with the concept.
  • Measure items in coins! Ever wonder how many coins it would take to make a line across the table? Use any assortment of coins. Find the most valuable¯ thing in your house- it may not always be the biggest thing!
  • Role play shopping around the house. Allow your child to be both the customer and the cashier. Use only coins to purchase items and to make change.